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Oral Piercing and Grills
Oral piercings are becoming increasingly popular. However, the American Dental Association and the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry have officially recommended against intraoral/perioral piercing and tongue splitting because of the potential for numerous negative sequelae, classified here as procedure-related risks and jewelry-related risks.

Procedure-Related Risks
 
Infection. Oral piercing carries a risk for infection due to trauma of the skin or oral tissues and the vast amount of bacteria in the mouth. Generally, the rate of infection is low if performed with sterile equipment and in an aseptic manner. Stainless steel tongue studs appear to be the most susceptible to bacterial colonization, followed by titanium studs, whereas plastic studs are the most inert to bacterial biofilm development.
 
Prolonged bleeding and possible nerve damage.
 
Swelling. This is a common symptom post-piercing.
 
Blood-borne disease transmission. Possible transmission of Hepatitis B,C,D, or G if performed in an non-sterile manner. Must ensure safe, hygienic process with sterile piercing tools.
 
Endocarditis: Inflammation of the lining of the heart and its valves.
Endocarditis: Inflammation of the lining of the heart and its valves.
Endocarditis. Oral piercing is a route of entry of bacteria into the bloodstream and may lead to endocarditis for patients with cardiac abnormalities. Even appropriate antibiotic prophylaxis may not prevent infection, as the bacteria may continue to seed the bloodstream through the open wound long after clearance of the antibiotic.
 
 
The American Dental Association and the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry recommend against all oral piercings.
 
The most common procedure-related risks are swelling, bleeding, and infection.
 
Oral piercings commonly injure the gums, tongue, or teeth.
 
Allergic reactions to the metal in piercings and grills may be delayed.
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