AAP Childhood Overweight and Obesity
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Health Equity


Health equity can be defined at "equity in health related to ethical and social justice issues in that is seeks to reduce health inequities between social groups - usually groups that have more and less privilege in society." (Horn, 2004)

Horn I, Beal A. Child Health Disparities: Framing a Research Agenda, Ambulatory Pediatrics 2004;
4:269-275.

Although overweight has increased for all children and adolescents over time, data indicate disparities exist among racial/ethnic groups.

  • Non-Hispanic African American girls and Mexican American girls are more likely to have high BMI for age than non-Hispanic white girls. 1
  • Among boys, Mexican Americans are more likely to have high BMI for age than non-Hispanic white boys.1 

To learn more visit: http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dnpa/obesity/childhood/prevalence.htm
1 Ogden C, et al.  "High Body Mass Index for Age Among US Children and Adolescents, 2003-2006."  Journal of the American Medical Association 2008, vol. 299, pp. 2401-2405.

In striving for healthy active living it is important to consider health disparities.  The links below are provided to assist you in your efforts.

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American Public Health Disparities Database

APHA Health Disparities Database
The American Public Health Association has developed a database which contains projects and interventions provided by members of the public health community. The database allows you to search for projects and interventions to health disparity challenges in your communities.

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Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Minority Health Determines the Health of the Nation

(http://www.cdc.gov/omhd/default.htm)
The Office of Minority Health and Health Disparities (OMHD) aims to accelerate CDC's health impact in the U.S population and to eliminate health disparities for vulnerable populations as defined by race/ethnicity, socio-economic status, geography, gender, age, disability status, risk status related to sex and gender, and among other populations identified to be at-risk for health disparities.

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Healthy People 2010

(http://www.healthypeople.gov)is designed to achieve two overarching goals: 1) Increase quality and years of healthy life; 2) Eliminate health disparities. Healthy People 2010 challenges individuals, communities, and professionals, indeed all of us to take specific steps to ensure that good health, as well as long life, are enjoyed by all.

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Health Disparities and Community Health, The Prevention Institute

(http://www.preventioninstitute.org/healthdis.html)
Low-income populations and communities of color disproportionately experience worse health and safety outcomes across a broad spectrum of illnesses, injuries, and treatments. Disparities in health among some income, racial, and ethnic groups in the US are significant and, by many measures, expanding. When elements of racism, poverty, and problematic community environments converge, greater overall threats to health develop. The most powerful factors shaping both health and health disparities are social and economic determinants, or the community conditions for health.

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Reducing Health Disparities Through a Focus on Communities

The report presents evidence from research and practice of the key role that neighborhood factors play in determining health outcomes and explores the relationship between the communities in which people live and their health."PolicyLink, November 2002.

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