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Lips
The lips, also known as labia, form the entryway of the mouth. There are
2 different surfaces of the lip:

 
1.
Skin
 
2.
Mucous membrane (vermilion border and internal surface)

Underlying the keratinized epithelium of the skin of the lips are the following structures:
 
Vasculature
 
Sweat glands
 
Hair follicles
 
Muscles that function to move the lips

The mucous membrane of the lips is non-keratinized with many capillary vessels close to the surface, giving it the pinkish/red color. Examination of the lips is valuable in recognizing signs of illness (eg,
Cyanosis: A bluish or purplish discoloration (as of skin) due to deficient oxygenation of the blood.
cyanosis, herpetic lesions) or trauma.
 
 
The lips, or labia, serve as the entryway to the mouth.
 
Examination of the lips is valuable in recognizing signs of illness or trauma.
 
There are 2 different surfaces of the lip—the skin and the mucous membrane.
 
The vasculature, sweat glands, and hair follicles underlie the keratinized epithelium of the lips.
 
The mucous membranes of the lips are
non-keratinized.
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