Preventing Sexual Violence
An Educational Toolkit for Health Care Professionals
WEB VERSION

Introduction
What Is Sexual Violence?
How Do I Prevent It?
Overview of Web version

Tools

Conclusion


OLDER ADOLESCENT VISIT

Objectives

  1. Understand the role of drug and alcohol use and peer group in sexual violence perpetration and victimization and be able to implement prevention and intervention strategies.
  2. Understand and be able to implement prevention and intervention strategies for rape.
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The HEEADSSS assessment can be used to structure counseling throughout adolescence. As teens become more independent (eg, beginning to drive, going to college, moving out of their parents’ home), it is critical that they be equipped to take responsibility for their personal safety. Although this discussion must begin much earlier, mid to late adolescence is an important time to discuss the consequences of drug and alcohol use.

Tools


Clinical
Quick reference guide

Parent/Patient
ACHA date rape prevention brochure

Practice Management
Tips for Making Your Practice Teen Friendly


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As older teens explore their newfound independence, the selection of peer group emerges as an important influence on sexual violence risk. Teens with friends who make good choices and avoid risky behaviors and situations are more likely themselves to make good choices and avoid risky behaviors and situations. Teens with friends who engage in risk-taking behaviors are more likely to engage in risk-taking behaviors and to find themselves in dangerous situations.


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Counseling on sexual violence prevention increases the likelihood of uncovering patients’ risky sexual behavior and experiences of sexual assault. Pediatricians should be sensitive to the psychological needs of assault victims and aware of community resources to which they can be referred for counseling.

Tools

Community Resources/Advocacy
The Pediatrician's Guide to Community Collaboration on Sexual Violence Prevention

Quiz Case

A 17-year-old boy is seen in your office for a college physical. The patient has been known to your practice for the past 15 years and is a shy, quiet individual.

1. In taking a sexual history, you ask

      1. “Have you had any girlfriends?”
      2. “You aren’t having sex, are you?”
      3. “Are you straight or gay?”
      4. “Have you had any sexual partners?”

2. The patient tells you he has had sexual contact with 2 males, both 17 years old. After a discussion about sexually transmitted infections and condom use, he asks, “Is it normal for sex with guys to be rough?” You respond

      1. “Sex with anyone should not be forced or hurtful.”
      2. “If you don’t tell partners ‘no,’ they won’t know they’re being rough.”
      3. “Maybe you would feel more comfortable with a female partner.”
      4. “Do you get sexual gratification even when it is rough?”

3. You would like to offer the young man some help. Which of the following is a reasonable resource for this situation?

      1. Domestic violence hotline
      2. Teens anonymous
      3. A rape crisis hotline
      4. Gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, and questioning (GLBTQ) organization

      Answers