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Section on Ophthalmology
Information about Retinoblastoma
Other Resources

American Academy of
Ophthalmology (AAO)

American Association for Pediatric
Ophthalmology and Strabismus
(AAPOS)

AAP Section on Hematology/
Oncology

Retinoblastoma in the News
Are you a basketball fan? As you may have heard, Derek Fisher of the Utah Jazz has a 10-month old
daughter who recently underwent surgery and chemotherapy for retinoblastoma. He has talked about the
importance of seeing an ophthalmologist/ pediatric ophthalmologist when there are concerns.

Retinoblastoma is one of the few pediatric ocular disorders that is potentially lethal. Pediatricians have a
vital role in diagnosing this tumor, which most commonly presents as an abnormality of the red reflex.
Prompt recognition of this finding and immediate referral to an ophthalmologist greatly improves the
chances for survival and preservation of vision.


For additional information, please contact Dr James Ruben, Chair of the Section on Ophthalmology
Executive Committee, at James.Ruben@kp.org.


WebMD
Retinoblastoma is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the tissues of the retina. The retina
is the nerve tissue that lines the inside of the back of the eye. The retina senses light and sends images to
the brain by way of the optic nerve. Although retinoblastoma may occur at any age, it usually occurs in
children younger than 5 years of age. The tumor may be in one eye or in both eyes. Retinoblastoma rarely
spreads from the eye to nearby tissue or other parts of the body. Retinoblastoma is usually found in only
one eye and can usually be cured. Retinoblastoma is sometimes caused by a gene mutation passed from
the parent to the child.

For additional information, please visit http://www.webmd.com/cancer/tc/Eye-retinoblastoma-Treatment-
Patient-Information-NCI-PDQ-General-Information-About


MedNews
The retina is the nerve tissue that lines the inside of the back of the eye. The retina senses light and sends
images to the brain by way of the optic nerve. Although retinoblastoma may occur at any age, it usually
occurs in children younger than 5 years of age. The tumor may be in one eye or in both eyes. Retino-
blastoma rarely spreads from the eye to nearby tissue or other parts of the body. Retinoblastoma is usually
found in only one eye and can usually be cured.

For additional information, please visit http://imsdd.meb.uni-bonn.de/cancer.gov/CDR0000258033.html.
 
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